Open Thread, Tuesday 8 October 2013

084_Michael_Forsberg_wild_turkeys_1024x1024 (1)
Photo by Michael Forsberg.

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About GruntOfMonteCristo

Fearless and Devout Catholic Christian First, Loving Husband and Father Second, Pissed-Off Patriot Third, Rocket Engineer Dork Last.
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27 Responses to Open Thread, Tuesday 8 October 2013

  1. Pistol Pete says:

    House GOP eyes supercommittee to settle shutdown, debt ceiling
    The capitulation begins;appoint a ‘supercommittee’ is like appointing a ‘blue ribbon panel’ so no one can be singled out for blame when Boehner ultimately caves as he always does.A common and lamentable practice utilized solely in DC.

    http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/appropriations/327145-house-to-vote-again-on-cr-conference#ixzz2h9Do0VLS

  2. Oh yeah, my favorite time of the year is here. 🙂
    The magnificance and glory of God’s creation is just AWESOME!!! One of the reasons I love the ocean so much and all the creatures God made within them.

  3. An excellent message from the “Future Vice President of the U.S.,” Mike Lee, Hat tip: Irony Curtain and BFH at iotw.

    The Obama Administration’s behavior during the first week of the shutdown has been the best argument against Obamacare anyone has ever made.

    The American people do not want Obamacare, and they are demanding that Washington act to protect them from the harmful effects of this unfortunate law. The president’s response has been to ignore them, allow the government to shutdown, and then use his power to close national parks and monuments, stop paying veterans’ benefits, and cut off cancer research.

    This is exactly why we should not expand the government’s power over our health care choices. What power the government has, it will use – and misuse – to advance its own interests, even if that means punishing the American people along the way.

    The message behind the Administration’s shutdown bullying is the same message sent by his IRS’s abuses of political opponents: do what I say, or else. This is the abusive, partisan, unaccountable bureaucracy that, under Obamacare, will soon be running America’s health care system.

    President Obama is not just using the vast powers of his office as leverage against Republicans – he is abusing his powers as leverage against the American people.

    The scenes of World War II veterans being shut out of a monument built in their honor should be a bright red flag warning the American people what an out-of-control federal government is capable of. Each day brings a new and more vivid example of why it is critical that we not allow Washington to reach even further into our most personal and intimate decisions.

    We now see how determined the president is to expand the power of the federal government and his willingness to use that power to harm the country to get what he wants. Congress cannot allow this to stand and should continue to work to end the shutdown and protect the American people from Obamacare.

    -Mike Lee

  4. Pistol Pete says:

    MEGYN KELLY MAKES HER PRIME TIME DEBUT BY DRAGGING FOX NEWS FAR TO THE LEFT.
    “So whats it like to be the most hated man in America?”

  5. solaratov says:

    Stole this from AoSHQ….

    Obamacare, recall, was sold with a specific set of political promises: The new regime, advocates insisted, would reduce the deficit, cover the needy, and reduce total health spending — all while lowering the premiums of those who were already insured. Back in 2007, when Obama was running for the Democratic nomination, he introduced what was then an embryonic proposal with the quixotic assurance that, “if you already have health insurance, the only thing that will change for you under this plan is the amount of money you will spend on premiums.” Then he adumbrated what would happen to the “amount of money” that Americans would “spend on premiums.” “That will be less,” Obama told anybody who would listen.

    In case you’re wondering, that’s “less” in the classical sense of the word, as opposed to in the sense of “more,” or “well, that depends on who you are.” Likewise, just so we’re painfully clear: When the president said that he was talking about people who “already have health insurance,” he meant that he was talking about people who already had health insurance. This is not a matter of opinion or a subjective piece of literary criticism. It is a fact. In plain language that he intended listeners to take at face value, Obama established a hypothesis — one that can be easily tested. He must be held to it.

    As a candidate, Obama also made this promise: “I will sign a universal health-care bill into law by the end of my first term as president that will cover every American and cut the cost of a typical family’s premium by up to $2,500 a year.” Again, this is not a “right-wing talking point,” nor is it a slur cooked up by an intransigent conservative movement intent upon destroying the president at all costs. It is a verbatim pledge that the candidate made to the American people on camera over and over and over and over again — so often, in fact, that the New York Times ran an entire feature on the “audacious promise” that was submitted in “speech after speech.”

    After he was elected president, Obama continued to make definite commitments. On June 15, 2009, in the midst of the legislative fight, the president told the American Medical Association’s annual meeting: “If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor. Period. If you like your health-care plan, you will be able to keep your health-care plan. Period. No one will take it away. No matter what.”

    To recap, then: Before, during, and after passage, Americans were promised that Obamacare was going to lower premiums for “everyone” (the goal of merely maintaining premiums being too modest); it was not going to interfere with anybody’s health care or health insurance if they already had it; and it was not going change anybody’s patient-doctor relationship. The message was unmistakable: All the government wanted to do was extend health insurance to people who didn’t have it. This wouldn’t affect you. No need to worry. Period. Move along.

    Good times…good times.

    👿

  6. solaratov says:

    (CNSNews.com) – The government shutdown may be keeping furloughed federal workers at home, but on Monday the U.S. Army contracted to buy a mechanical bull. The $47,174 contract was awarded on Oct. 7 to Mechanical Bull Sales Inc. of State College, Penn.

    Note that the contract was let AFTER the shutdown was in ‘full effect’.

    BTW, WHAT THE HELL DOES THE US GOVERNMENT NEED WITH A MECHANICAL BULL?

    👿

  7. Any opinions on these TAC boot laces?

    • solaratov says:

      If they were inexpensive enough, I’d at least give’em a try.

      But I don’t think I’d feel deprived if I had to keep lacing my boots the old-fashioned way. 😉

      • I doubt they’re real inexpensive. They also seem too complicated, but at least they give you a little relief from the two-handedness and slowness of the boot laces. The speed thing may not sound like a big deal, but time is really critical in the AM when you’re rolling out of the sack and half the team is already stomping around telling you to get your sh!t together. In combat that would be even more important.

        My first question was why not just go to velcro boots if this is a real issue? I can see where you don’t want to go that far, since they might wear out before the boots do, they collect burrs and chaff and they’re not repairable, so you gotta throw your boots away when the velcro goes bad. So the tac-laces would give you some speed and convenience at lace-up while being easily replaceable and you get to keep the basic lace boot as fall-back.

        I don’t know, but I’m thinking this doesn’t really look like the answer.

    • barnslayer says:

      I’ll pass. Some boots have locking eyelets about halfway up. This gadget wouldn’t work on them, at least not too easily. Other boots I like to double lace in that transition area so again this thing is out. Last, that wrap around strap uses Velcro ( I think). Some Velcro type attachments are weak and may work loose or wear out. Then there’s that Velcro noise.

  8. texan59 says:

    Great news for barrycare enrollees in MD. Your info can and will be used “with the appropriate authorities for law enforcement and audit activities.” I’m sure that is much the same around the Country. 👿

    http://tiny.cc/r13n4w

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